Use Wood Chips For Weed Control

Wood chips do a great job smothering the weeds in our garden. A 3-foot pile about 10-feet long helped clear a patch of thick bermuda grass. Now the area is ready to plant. We didn’t dig up the ground at all just picked at it a little. The dead roots of the Bermuda grass act as pathways for water and bacteria to spread. This helps break up our thick clay. The hot pile was in place for 3 months. In the future we would like to extract the waste heat to heat our house. On another side-note bermuda grass has potential as a biofuel. So there is no such thing as weeds they only exist in frustrated gardener’s imaginations.

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0960852411007553

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The thick bermuda grass looked like it was not coming back. If it does we’ll cover it with another compost pile next winter and repeat. IMG_4717

IMG_4743We added a layer of the broken down wood chips to the pool garden conversion.

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Plant your mint in an area it won’t be able to spread into your whole garden. If it does spread mulch helps keep it under control. This weed smells nice and has not gone to flowering stage yet.

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IMG_4770The turnips are ready to harvest. The radishes are starting to flower. We will have seeds of them soon. These were planted from seed in February. You could pull a hand full of them per day and still it seems there is too many. This close together planting method conserves water. Just be careful mold doesn’t develop. To prevent this don’t water at night. Let it dry out underneath. This area is next to the north side of the greenhouse. The areas outside and next to the greenhouse are great areas where micro climate control takes place.

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Some of the dill has flowered but some is still producing.

IMG_4765Broccoli I think?

IMG_4764Melons and cucumbers are coming in. The grow holes are sunken basins filled with about 4 inches of top soil, manure, sulfur, blood and bone meal on top of the clay ground. A sprayer is used until this stage when the drip line takes over. A few shovel scoops will thin out the area and the clumps with plants growing from them will be transplanted else where.

IMG_4751 Our winter kale’s seeds are just about ready to harvest. Each pod contains 20 seeds about. Each plant has 10-80 pods. That’s up to a 1600 from 1 return.

IMG_4763 IMG_4749The birds have left the kale seeds alone so far. They really went after the mustard seeds we harvested a few weeks back.

IMG_4753Our dill flowers get attacked by aphids. Soapy water sprayed on them is a good natural insecticide.

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IMG_4740The fig tree is growing great.

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IMG_4697New areas once covered in burmuda grass are now covered with logs and wood chips. Once the grass is dead we’ll run irrigation to it and plant it. This way the garden spreads.

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Many of the seedlings are started in the greenhouse. The bottom  panels were removed so CO2 can enter. A shovel removes a clump of soil with the plants growing in it. The whole clump is transplanted to an area with more room. The lettuces growing in the pool conversion were transplanted from this area. Sweet peas are growing in the kale about to seed. We cast seeds into the kale and then when we remove them in about 3 weeks the plants will be ready to take there place.

 

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